performance 2 (passage) – public inter...
performance 2 (passage), jumping
performance 2 (passage), jumping
performance 2 (passage), floating
performance 2 (passage), floating
performance 2 (passage), johannesburg c...
performance 2 (passage),  johannesburg c...
performance 2 (passage), cartwheel
performance 2 (passage), cartwheel
performance 2 (passage), ready and set
performance 2 (passage), ready and set
performance 2 (passage), sketch
performance 2 (passage), sketch
performance 2 (passage), jump
performance 2 (passage), jump
performance 2 (passage), Downtown Joburg
performance 2 (passage), Downtown Joburg
performance 2 (passage), cartwheeling
performance 2 (passage), cartwheeling
performance 2 (passage), chain
performance 2 (passage), chain
performance 2 (passage), chatting
performance 2 (passage), chatting
performance 2 (passage), holding hands
performance 2 (passage), holding hands
performance 2 (passage), holding on
performance 2 (passage), holding on
performance 2 (passage), looking up
performance 2 (passage), looking up
performance 2 (passage), set up
performance 2 (passage), set up
performance 2 (passage), specs
performance 2 (passage), specs

performance 2 (passage)

The second in my series of Sentimental Constructions, performance 2 (passage) is a similarly site-conditioned, publicly performed architectural structure made of rope. The piece, erected in Joubert Park, Johannesburg South Africa (2007), twists the idea of ‘public space’ by its double activation: first, through the volunteers who stretch its form outward and around them; and second, through the communal play of the park’s inhabitants, which gives the structure a performative turn.

Although the design is, itself, a passage – several doorframe shapes in series, swinging freely from atop four wooden poles – it can only move between hard and soft, virtual and actual, public and private, through its contact with people. This is juxtaposed with the inconsistencies of South Africa’s major inner-city: crumbling art deco buildings surrounded by crowded streets and busy taxi ranks, all making way for the quiet of the Johannesburg Art Gallery’s neo-classical architecture, and the leisurely games, picnics and ice cream stands in the inexplicably carved-out Joubert Park. The surrounding areas of the park have historically been a bundle of contradictions – before, during and after Apartheid – sustained as civic spaces because of how they’re used by the public. performance 2 playfully mirrors the contradictions of this space and its utility, and further underpins the tensions between work and play, nostalgia and possibility, construction and emergence.